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HOW I TURN PROSPECTS INTO CLIENTS

If you are a service based business, you know the importance of building trust early in order to retain a client. If you often find yourself having trouble with standing out, here's what I do in my business to convert leads into customers.


I do my homework

 

With every lead, I intentionally review their social media and website to gain a thorough understanding of their business and potential pain points.

 

A service provider should "solve" problems. How do you know you are the best service provider for them if you don't have any insight of their potential needs?

 

This leaves a lot of room for miscommunication and unmet expectations as you are solely relying on the lead to verbally tell you their problems - problems they may not even really understand or know yet


I prepare guiding questions in advance

Before every consultation, I prepare questions relative to observations I have made in the homework stage.
 
I ask questions relative to their business history, present pains, and ask about future milestones and benchmarks.
 
While they are talking to me, I take thorough notes and make sure to document their feedback - even if they end up not picking me as their service provider at the end.
 
This gesture emphasizes my interest and dedication in their business but also will serve as my guide to ensure my work exceeds their expectations if we work together.


man signing a contract
Photography By Fring Gustavo



I am fully transparent about pricing and timeline

There are a number of reasons why a client may choose to work with someone else - pricing being a main one.
 
During a consultation, I am fully transparent about pricing, but I do this strategically. Pricing is one of the last things I talk about, mostly due to the fact that quotes are determined by business needs, but also because you've already established trust.
 
A client has been introduced to a potential solution to their problem and feels a sensation of relief and excitement, not dread and doubt making it more likely they'd be willing to invest.
 
Another strategy of mine is to offer payment plans only in the event that a customer makes a verbal statement of delay.
 
Traditionally all services are charge at 50% down and 50% at the end. If a client expresses their need to wait or delay months or even years, I offer them the opportunity to customize a payment plan of up to 1 year, allowing them access to the service when they need it, but giving them an opportunity to pay over time.


I ask them their thoughts

At this stage, my part is over.
 
When the consultation is coming to a close, I prompt them to simply talk to me and I serve as a listening ear with no agenda.
 
Clients may have questions of their own or divert the conversation towards something we have in common.
 
This stage is my favorite. We entered into a conversation as strangers, and regardless of the outcome, we've left one another having learned something interesting about another person.
 
There are many people in my contact list whom I've never worked with that I check in with regularly and would consider to be my friend.
 
This stage is also important because you are re-instating the idea that you are not just a service provider but a person that will invest in a relationship with someone else.
 
This is what truly makes you stand out.

It's not your services, it's not your talent or pricing or process or anything. Your ability to notice people and care about them regardless of whether they have something to offer you in return makes the world of a difference and is what truly makes you stand out from the rest.



 

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